Sickening secrets of the Jeremy Kyle show

Sickening secrets of the Jeremy Kyle show: Former ITV staff reveal how vulnerable guests were baited and duped in a cynical drive to entertain viewers

  • Jeremy Kyle show used sickening tactics to entertain viewers, former crew said
  • Including telling addicts they were in competition for a single rehabilitation bed
  • One ex-worker said they turned a ‘shy, quiet’ girl into a ‘fireball’ before shooting
  • Another said that they ‘had blood on my hands’ after participant took his own life 

Former employees have revealed horrific behind-the-scenes secrets of the Jeremy Kyle Show in a bombshell documentary.

They have lifted the lid on the sickening tactics used by the programme to heighten guest’s distress to entertain viewers.

This included telling addicts they were in competition with other participants for a single rehabilitation bed, even though there was room for them all.

Such was the goading of guests on the show, one former worker described turning a ‘shy, quiet’ girl into a ‘fireball’ before she went on air.

A former member of the crew also said they felt like they ‘had blood on my hands’ after participant Steve Dymond took his own life following an appearance in May 2019.

Ex-staff revealed how they would receive regular calls from guests threatening to kill themselves – but tried to talk them out of it so the show went on air and did not ‘waste any money’.

Jeremy Kyle Show – Death on Daytime, which starts on Sunday, comes after the programme was canned by ITV in 2019.

Former employees have revealed horrific behind-the-scenes secrets of the Jeremy Kyle Show in a bombshell documentary

This was the result of a public outcry prompted by the death of Mr Dymond, 63, who took an overdose after failing a lie- detector test on the show.

Former staff on the show told of how they ‘made up’ the test’s accuracy and claimed it was ‘99.9 per cent’ and ‘97 per cent’ accurate. However, a Commons select committee heard evidence from academic research that the test was at best ‘66 per cent to 70 per cent’ accurate.

An ex-employee told the Channel 4 documentary: ‘I felt like I had blood on my hands. We felt like we had killed someone.’ Former staff members – voiced by actors in the documentary – also told of their concern at speaking out against the programme.

‘The number of secrets we kept was frightening,’ one said. ‘If I was found to be speaking out it would be career suicide. It is scary to go against ITV – a massive corporation when I am just me.’

They also spoke of the deliberate tactics used to get the most extreme behaviour from show guests.

One said: ‘They would love seeing a girl turn up, you know shy, quiet, scraggly and you would be put with that girl all day and you would turn her into this fireball.’ 

The former staff revealed how they too had been exploited and put under huge pressure to book guests, no matter how unsuitable. 

‘Everybody was exploited without even knowing it and if you went along with it you were fine and if you didn’t you were sacked,’ one past worker said.

Another said: ‘We were literally like rats in a lab, each in our little cages in there. You never left your desk sometimes, 14, 15 hours at that desk.’ They said they became ‘desensitised’ and drank after work to ‘decompress’.

They also spoke of how they would play down some of the participants’ mental health concerns in a bid to get them on the show.

Former employees also took aim at Kyle himself. One said: ‘Jeremy was incredibly nasty, really just demeaning.’

Another said: ‘And he would make comments to us about the guests, insinuating that they were thick or that they were scruffs.

‘This is quite disturbing because you just get the sense that he didn’t care about these people and if you don’t care about them you shouldn’t be doing that job.’

On Sunday, TV presenter Jeremy Kyle was pictured on holiday in Barbados with third wife Vicky Burton.

Later in the documentary a former employee said: ‘To him people are just things. They’re objects that he can exploit. He takes from them the little good they have had in their lives.

‘If there was someone who had mental health issues, he didn’t care and he would rip into them.’

Another ex-employee described working on the programme as being ‘like a black stain on my soul’, while a backstage cameraman said he had witnessed ‘back-to-back psychological carnage’.

Senior Tory MP Damian Collins said he believed ITV bosses knew what was going on. 

He added: ‘People at the top of the company should have asked more questions. It’s impossible to believe that no-one within the company raised concerns about this.’

ITV said: ‘More than 20,000 people took part in the show seeking help to resolve relationship issues, or to address drug or alcohol related problems… and the show achieved many positive outcomes. 

‘The show had a dedicated guest welfare team of mental healthcare professionals. Guests were supported prior to filming, throughout filming and after filming.

‘ITV does not accept the central allegation of this programme of a “bad culture” within the production team. ITV would never condone any of its production staff misleading or lying to guests.’

ITV said all the guests were ‘aware of the nature of the show and the presenter’s style’ and gave written consent.

Channel 4 said: ‘Jeremy Kyle was approached for a response to the series. He did not provide a statement for broadcast. We will reflect his position in the film.’

On Sunday, Kyle was pictured on holiday in Barbados with third wife Vicky Burton.

Jeremy Kyle Show: Death on Daytime starts on Sunday at 9pm on Channel 4.

ITV said: ‘More than 20,000 people took part in the show seeking help to resolve relationship issues, or to address drug or alcohol related problems… and the show achieved many positive outcomes’

Shame on ITV… and sneering liberals revelling in human misery

Commentary by Christopher Stevens for the Daily Mail 

Human bear-baiting – that’s how The Jeremy Kyle Show was described, not by a TV reviewer but by a district court judge.

In 2007, two years after the ITV morning show first aired, Judge Alan Berg heard the trial of a man aged 45 who head- butted his lodger after learning on the show that his wife was having an affair with him.

‘This type of incident is exactly what the producers want,’ said the judge. ‘These self-righteous individuals should be in the dock with you. They pretend there is some virtue in putting out a show like this.’

Incredibly, Kyle’s obnoxious spectacle of humiliation continued to screen for the next 12 years. It was not axed until 2019, when 63-year-old Steve Dymond, of Portsmouth, died from an overdose, a week after appearing on the show.

Mr Dymond wanted to prove to a former partner that he had not been unfaithful to her. Instead, he was held up to ridicule in front of millions.

Now a two-part Channel 4 documentary on Sunday and Monday is to expose the machinations of researchers and producers on the show, accused of rounding up guests and then stoking resentments and jealousies to the point of explosion.

Johann Hari in the Independent unironically called it ‘wonderfully progressive’ for exposing ‘homophobes, misogynists [and] neglectful parents’

The investigation includes behind-the-scenes footage as well as interviews with people who say their lives were wrecked by the show. 

But just as guilty were the snobbish Left-wing media commentators who relished the sight of desperate, unhappy people being goaded into fits of rage.

Johann Hari in the Independent unironically called it ‘wonderfully progressive’ for exposing ‘homophobes, misogynists [and] neglectful parents’. 

The headline on his piece grotesquely referred to Kyle as ‘a moral hero of our time’.

In the Guardian, Derek Draper (who worked on another Kyle show as a psychotherapist) described the presenter as ‘a strong father figure’ who was teaching ‘responsibility and restraint’ to guests.

‘How many of us have watched, transfixed, from behind our Guardians on our days off?’ asked Draper, today of course the tragically Covid-stricken husband of ITV’s Kate Garraway. 

Other commentators simply gloried in how the show mocked Britain’s poorest and worst-educated people, often drug addicts and alcoholics.

The BBC’s Charlie Brooker called them ‘a cast of people who resemble a sort of aquatic livestock’. 

The liberal elite’s intense condescension for the guests – mostly white Britons from provincial cities – empowered Kyle to continue his ritual shaming and exploitation.

To look back at the series now is to see an endless low point for television. People were tricked on to the show and then held up to ridicule.

Some of the worst segments defy belief – and were engineered to do just that.

Other commentators simply gloried in how the show mocked Britain’s poorest and worst-educated people, often drug addicts and alcoholics. The BBC’s Charlie Brooker called them ‘a cast of people who resemble a sort of aquatic livestock’

In 2015, Kyle ran an interview with Bristol man Ted Richards, then 57, under the banner, ‘Parrot Man is getting a beak… and that’s not the worst of it’.

Ted had colourful feathers tattooed over his face, and had his ears surgically removed to make his head more like a parrot’s – as well as plume-like bones that screwed on to his skull.

In 2014, Kyle was criticised by Ofcom for his treatment of a teenager accused of stealing from her mother to feed a drug habit. She denied it, but failed a lie detector test – a deeply unscientific piece of circus.

Kyle told the audience that the 17-year-old had ‘a reputation’ and had slept with 33 men. Her older sister called the girl ‘a crackhead’ and ‘a silly anorexic slapper’, with no intervention from the host – even when the teenager began sobbing and shouting in protest.

That was the fourth time Kyle was reported to Ofcom. The previous three occasions had all been for the use of foul language. 

Astonishingly, some of the most obnoxious segments – such as an interview with a man who boasted of having sex with both his stepdaughters – resulted in no official reprimand. 

Often the aim appeared to be provoking physical clashes, so that security guards could make a display of separating rivals.

Often the aim appeared to be provoking physical clashes, so that security guards could make a display of separating rivals

Kyle himself would occasionally be sucked into the fracas: an angry father once snatched an envelope containing DNA results and hit him over the head with it.

Another time, a woman grabbed the papers and shoved Kyle. He fell backwards theatrically, landing on his backside – then gave chase, accusing the woman of theft and demanding the return of his property.

The Jeremy Kyle Show has been consigned to the dustbin but, for many of those who appeared, the shame will dog them for a lifetime.

The real humiliation belongs to ITV for staging this revolting spectacle – and to the chattering classes who treated it as an opportunity to sneer at their social inferiors.

Overdose tragedy after TV humiliation

Steve Dymond said he hoped he would ‘make good ratings’ for Kyle’s show in a series of anguished messages sent to his fiancee before his apparent suicide.

The 63-year-old was found dead from a suspected morphine overdose after being grilled by Jeremy Kyle on the ITV show in May 2019.

Dymond had been trying to win back his fiancee Jane Callaghan after denying he had cheated on her – but failed a lie detector test for the programme.

In his final text messages to her, Dymond wrote: ‘I hope the Jeremy Kyle show is so happy now. They are responsible for what happens now.

‘I hope this makes good ratings for them. I bet they keep this quiet. Never never never did I cheat on you. Never never. My final words.’

Channel 4’s explosive documentary also disclosed some voice messages which Dymond sent to Miss Callaghan following the show.

Steve Dymond said he hoped he would ‘make good ratings’ for Kyle’s show in a series of anguished messages sent to his fiancee before his apparent suicide. The 63-year-old was found dead from a suspected morphine overdose after being grilled by Jeremy Kyle on the ITV show in May 2019

In one, an emotional Dymond said: ‘I was being so truthful. I really was. I really was. I was telling you the truth sweetheart, I was not lying a bit. Not one bit. I’m not lying to you. I wouldn’t do that to you. I wouldn’t… I wouldn’t lie to you again. I will not lie to you again I swear to God, I wouldn’t lie to you again, I wouldn’t.’

Questions have now been raised about the accuracy of the lie detector tests used on the show.

Discussing the last time she saw her fiance, Miss Callaghan told the documentary: ‘Then there was a knock at the door and I went out.

‘I looked out the window and he’s like “five minutes, five minutes” and I’m like “no, go away Steve” and I just drew the curtains.’

She added: ‘That was the last time I see him and I don’t think I’ll ever get that out of my head.’

 Cruel trick on addicts  

Addicts on Kyle’s show were told they were vying with each other for a bed in rehab in a bid to make them to show ‘more emotion on stage’, it has been claimed.

Former workers on the show revealed the sick tactic, described by the mother of one of the show’s guests as ‘soul-destroying’.

Kristie Bishop appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show in 2018, where she admitted tricking her grandparents out of money to fund her drug addiction. 

After a stay in rehab, she went on the show for a second time in 2019, showing off her transformation.

Her mother, Dominique, 54, told the Channel 4 documentary: ‘We were told there were several families going for a place in rehab and that we had to fight for that place. The most desperate family was going to get that help.’

One former show worker revealed: ‘The lie came when you were in the studio. You would tell the addicts and their families that there’s three other families going on the stage. It’s a fight for that one bed.’

They said show bosses knew of the tactic. Kristie Bishop, 35, having apparently turned her life around, died of an overdose in 2020.

Kristie Bishop (right, with her mother Dominique Bishop) appeared on the Jeremy Kyle Show in 2018, where she admitted tricking her grandparents out of money to fund her drug addiction. But having apparently turned her life around, she died of an overdose in 2020

Source: Read Full Article