Fed up transport worker calls out eshay graffitiing on the train

Fed up transport worker calls out young eshay brazenly graffitiing on the train – with the teen then hanging his head in shame

  • Transport officer catches young graffiti vandal tagging a train with marker pen
  • The shocked teenager hangs his head in shame when approached by guard
  • Rail worker who films the teen tells him: ‘This is going straight to the police’

A young eshay scribbling graffiti on a busy train in the middle of the day has been caught in the act by a fed up transport worker.

In mobile phone video, the rail guard is seen telling the long-haired teen in a dark hoodie and shorts: ‘You’re on camera now and this is going straight to the police.’

Visually shaken by the interruption, the teen puts the black marker pen down midway through his tag and hangs his head in shame.

Police are now investigating the act of vandalism which took place April 7 on the way from Gosford to Woy Woy station on the Central Coast of New South Wales.

The 22-year-old transport worker told Daily Mail Australia he’s forced to deal with eshays graffitiing carriages on a regular basis and this time he’d ‘had enough’.

‘They’re brazen. They don’t just do it when the rain is empty, they do it when the train is full,’ the guard who wished to remain anonymous said.

‘I’m just fed up with seeing them doing it all the time. It makes the train look ugly.’

The transport officer added that although the teen seemed remorseful, he doesn’t have much sympathy for him.

‘If you look at the way he was writing the graffiti, it was obvious he wasn’t a new starter. He’s definitely done it many times before. So he’s probably done a lot of damage,’ he said.

‘And after I filmed it, when the train pulled up at Woy Woy, the doors opened and he bolted from the train.

‘I don’t think he’s learnt his lesson either because I still see that tag around the place.’

A young eshay scribbling graffiti on a busy train (pictured) in the middle of the day has been caught in the act by a cool-headed transport officer who captured the incident on video

Visually shaken by the interruption, the teen (pictured) puts the black marker pen down midway through his tag and hangs his head in shame

Each year, graffiti on the state’s rail network costs the taxpayer about $30million a year, with about ’40 football fields’ of marker pen and spray paint needing to be scrubbed off.

Sydney Trains acting chief executive Stewart Mills told 9News: ‘It’s an enormous cost and a burden’.

‘These people are not artists, they are criminals.’

He warns there are more than 24,000 cameras across the rail network and that it’s only a matter of time before vandals get caught.

The penalty for vandalising a train in NSW is up to five years’ in jail or a $2200 fine.

HOW TO SPOT AND ESHAY

Eshays wear Nike TN trainers with polo shirts, puffer jackets, tracksuit pants or baggy shorts and baseball caps.

Favoured labels include Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, and Lacoste, paired with Nautica, Adidas, Under Armour and Ellesse.

Some eshays scramble words and put ‘ay’ on the end in a form of pig Latin. ‘Eetswa’ means ‘sweet’ and ‘chill’ becomes ‘illchay’. 

Hard-core eshays engage in assaults, robberies and threatening behaviour against other youths but many seem to wander the streets aimlessly. 

Does your child wear a bumbag, speak in ‘pig Latin’ and get into strife at the train station… beware, they could be an ‘eshay’, part of Australia’s most despised sub-culture 

BY STEPHEN GIBBS FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA

They prowl in packs, speaking their own mashed-up language as they strut around town in designer sportswear with a generally menacing attitude.

But are eshays a serious threat to polite society or just the latest incarnation of disaffected youths wanting to stand out from the crowd by looking the same as each other?

Whatever the motive for urban teenagers with bad haircuts donning Nike TNs and slinging bumbags over one shoulder, they are apparently overtaking the suburbs.

The rise of the eshay is reportedly striking fear into middle-class parents worried their children want to emulate a dangerous sub-culture.

Eshays prowl in packs, speaking their own mashed-up language as they strut around town in dark designer clothes with a generally menacing attitude

Whatever the motive for urban teenagers with bad haircuts donning Nike TNs and slinging bumbags over their shoulders, they are apparently overtaking the suburbs

Where eshays once predominantly came from disadvantaged backgrounds their ethos is now more mainstream and widely promoted on social media.

An eshay is easily identifiable by the aforementioned TN trainers, worn with polo shirts, puffer jackets, tracksuit pants or baggy shorts and baseball caps. 

Favoured labels for the fashionable eshay include Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, and Lacoste, paired with Nautica, Adidas, Under Armour and Ellesse.

He should give the impression he is looking to score drugs or moments away from robbing an innocent passerby of their belongings.

Some eshays scramble words and put ‘ay’ on the end in a form of pig Latin. ‘Eetswa’ means ‘sweet’ and ‘chill’ becomes ‘illchay’.

In January a young ‘eshay’ with a mullet threatened to bash an adult on a Melbourne train, before declaring that he ‘owns Frankston’. A bystander filmed the boy, who appeared to be about 13 years old, attempting to intimidate – or ‘staunch’ the man (pictured)

An eshay is easily identifiable by wearing Nike TN trainers with polo shirts, puffer jackets, tracksuit pants or baggy shorts and baseball caps. Pictured is an image from an eshay social media page

The term eshay is similar to the UK phrase ‘chav’ and can be interchangeable with ‘lad’, which in turn sometimes becomes ‘adlay’.

‘Eshay’ may have started as ‘eshay adlay’ – pig Latin for ‘he’s lad’ or be related to ‘sesh’, for a prolonged period of drug consumption.

When an eshay says ‘eshay’ it can mean yes, cool or excellent. 

Something high-risk is ‘red hot’ and an idiot is a ‘gronk’. To ‘staunch’ someone is to intimidate them, often with an intense stare while the challenger’s fists are held between their legs.

Eshays are said to have spread from Sydney’s inner-city graffiti scene in the 1980s through Housing Commission estates and out into the suburbs.

Hard-core eshays engage in assaults, robberies and threatening behaviour against other youths but many seem to wander the streets and hang around train stations aimlessly. 

Some are said to ‘roll’ victims for their shoes and clothes but such crimes are not widely reported.

While some eshays had domestic backgrounds of violence, poverty and drug or alcohol use, many were likely copying a look that suggested a criminal outlook.

Their antics, which can include carrying weapons and taking drugs, are often filmed and posted on Tik Tok to widespread amusement. 

The drill rap of groups such as Mount Druit outfit OneFour is a popular accompaniment.

Parents on Sydney’s Northern Beaches have recently expressed concerns about anti-social behaviour of teens they describe as dressing like eshays.

To an eshay something high-risk is ‘red hot’ and an idiot is a ‘gronk’. To ‘staunch’ someone is to intimidate them, often with an intense stare while the starer’s fists are held between their legs

Local police targeted youth crime over the Christmas holidays and warned parents to take an interest in where there children are, who they are with and what they are doing.

Dr Terry Goldsworthy, Associate Professor of Criminology at Bond University told the Telegraph eshays had become prominent in the past seven or so years.

‘Like any subculture there are influencers on social media,’ the onetime detective inspector said. ‘It’s monkey see, monkey do.

‘A few years ago I’d never heard the term eshay, but I think social media has something to do with it.’

Just like punks in the 1970s and 1980s the eshay will one day be replaced by another set of clothes and taste in music, with a new name and similar anti-authoritarian demeanour.   

‘Like any subculture, today’s eshay will be tomorrow’s nerd,’ Dr Goldsworthy said.

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