Crowds flock to Jeremy Clarkson's farm shop

Cotswolds chaos! Hundreds of customers queue outside as crowds flock to Jeremy Clarkson’s farm shop

  • Jeremy Clarkson’s new Amazon show chronicles his life on his Cotswolds farm
  • The popularity of the show has led to queues for the Diddly Squat Farm Shop
  • At estate near Chadlington, Oxfordshire, yesterday, hundreds queued outside

His reality show chronicling life on his 1,000-acre Cotswolds farm has been a runaway hit for Jeremy Clarkson.

But sadly not for his neighbours. Their peace has been shattered by the hundreds of fans flocking to the star’s farm shop.

The popularity of Clarkson’s Farm on Amazon Prime has led to queues for the Diddly Squat Farm Shop to check out his stock, which includes honey, chutney and even T-shirts.

At the estate near Chadlington, Oxfordshire, yesterday, hundreds queued to go inside.

TV presenter Jeremy Clarkson meets fans at his Diddly Squat Farm Shop near Chadlington, Oxfordshire

The popularity of Clarkson’s Farm on Amazon Prime has led to queues to check out his stock

Political commentator Isabel Oakeshott shared a video of the crowds on Twitter, which showed streams of people gathering outside the shop, run by Clarkson’s partner Lisa Hogan, as well as a jam-packed car park.

In the 30-second clip she could be heard saying that the farm was ‘mobbed’ with ‘hundreds of cars’ and people waiting around two hours to check out what the shop had on offer. 

She captioned it: ‘Oh, Jeremy Clarkson and Amazon Video what have you done?! Certainly, earning more than Diddly Squat with the farm now! At least 500 people here; chaos on surrounding roads. Next step – theme park?’

The stock at the Cotswolds farm shop includes honey, chutney and even T-shirts

Queues began to form outside the farm shop the day after the show was released on Amazon Prime

The former Top Gear co-host, 61, and his farm shop have angered locals complaining about visitors clogging up the country roads. 

Some have also claimed it is affecting the trade of local shops and pubs by selling food and even beer.

Speaking previously about the farm shop’s success, Clarkson said: ‘I mean, if we’d built a nuclear power station I could understand their concerns, but not a tiny farm shop.’

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