Amy Roloff Confirms She Will Be Part of 2020 Pumpkin Season After Moving Off Farm

Although Amy Roloff no longer lives on the family farm, she won't be missing the 2020 pumpkin season.

More than a week after her ex-husband, Matt Roloff, announced that Roloff Farms will be open to the public despite the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Amy confirmed that she will be present for this year's festivities.

″Fall is here. Woohoo! 🎃 That means Pumpkin season is here too. Roloff Farms is open for pumpkin season. It’ll still be a fun family time just a different kind of fun because of the challenging times we are in. Check out the Roloff Farms website to make reservations and for more info – www.rolofffarms.com,″ Amy, 56, wrote alongside an Instagram photo of herself standing on her doorstep, which is adorned with fall leaves, flowers and decor.

″I’ll be there in costume helping out in the fall pumpkin season festivities. Hope to see some of you there in mask and to say hi 🍁🌻🧡🎃🧡🌻🍁″ she continued. ″#rolofffarms #pumpkinseason #lovefall #leavesandapples #cideranddonuts #amyroloffssecondact.″

The Roloff family hosts pumpkin picking on their Oregon farm annually, as seen on their hit TLC show Little People, Big World.

Last October, Amy opened up about her love for fall and the legacy and memories her family has built over the course of 20-plus pumpkin seasons. ″Wow! How can Roloff Farms Pumpkin season be here already? And 20 plus years? It’s been a blast and full of wonderful times and memories. And more memories to make. What a family legacy I’ve love sharing w/ you. The Fall season is here 🍁🍂🎃🍂🍁 and there is So Much to love about Fall. My favorite season,″ she wrote on Instagram.

Amy also admitted that she wasn't ″a part of Pumpkin season as much as I want or can be this year, for various reason[s].″

″I’ll always love seeing and meeting so many of you that come. I’ll share some stories of people I’ve met so far this year, stories shared that impacted me. Many of you inspire me and I so appreciate you coming to the farm. It’s a unique place. It has impacted my life and gave me the gift of raising my kids here for through out their growing up years. I’m glad we are able to share it w/ you," she said.

Last February, Amy said goodbye to the property, on which she lived for three decades and raised four children with Matt (they divorced in 2016): twins Jeremy and Zach, 30, daughter Molly, 27, and son Jacob, 23.

Documenting her move from the farm to her new house, Amy said in an Instagram post that ″after 30 years – I’m going through everything and oh what memories come flooding my mind of a lot of things that went on in this house raising four kids.″

“And I’m thankful I got to do it though it’s been hard and tough purging. Oh I’m sure I’ll be doing more once I get ‘stuff’ to my new house thinking ‘why did I pack this’ ?″ she said.

While Amy admitted that the journey had been a mixture of emotions, she did see “some light at the end.”

“I’m thrilled to see some light at the end of this long journey of moving, purging, packing and moving into my new house. Woohoo!” said Amy. “Sometimes I don’t know whether to jump up and yell ‘Hooray’ or cry. I do know I feel relieved. More adventures to explore, plan for all the while being grateful.”

Her fiancé, Chris Marek, had also been supporting her through her post-divorce move. “Chris is by my side rooting for me and helping so much. He has been tremendous. ♥️,” she said about her husband-to-be. “So I see the light at the end of this tunnel and I think I’ll make my end date- end of February. Yippee!″

Although Amy no longer resides on the property, she'll be joining Matt, 58, and other family members in putting on this year's harvest season — which is going to look different than in years past.

In a ″big news" Instagram video on Sept. 17, Matt confirmed that the farm will be open to visitors, but safety guidelines will be implemented.

″We're gonna open for our pumpkin festival, but it's going to look very, very different — extraordinarily different than any years past,″ said Matt.

For those who have visited the farm before and ″have an expectation, this year, we think it's going to be just as good,″ Matt said, ″but it's going to be our COVID version of the pumpkin festival.″

What exactly does that entail?

″It's going to take place in a more intimate setting, although we're going to stretch out,″ he explained. ″We're going to give everybody access to a walking trail here on the farm,″ which is something they've ″never done″ before. ″Never let everybody kind of walk into this area of the farm. They've seen some of it from a distance on the wagon tours.″

But there's one catch.

″You've gotta make a reservation," said Matt, who directed viewers to the farm's website. ″There's gonna be a fee involved. Yes, I know in the past we've always opened the farm with no charge, no parking fee, but this year's going to be different."

The farm will open Oct. 2 — when the family is ″reasonably certain the air will be fresh" in the wake of the disastrous wildfires that have ravaged the west coast.

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