Jenni Kayne and Malia Mills Are Courting Shoppers in the Hamptons

With the Hamptons overridden with summer residents, day trippers and city escapees, the number of brands looking to entice shoppers there is increasing.

Jenni Kayne is opening a permanent store and design showroom in Amangansett at 10 Amagansett Square Drive on July 28. Located near Ulla Johnson and Henry Lehr, the shop is offering the brand’s full furniture collection as well as apparel and accessories. Shoppers in the 1,500-square-foot store can check out the brand’s first design bar and meet Kayne’s team of interiors designers, on staff to offer inspiration projects, review swatches and wood samples, assist with ordering furniture and more.

Activations and special events are in the works for a limited time, including complimentary yoga on the lawn with Mandala Yoga Amagansett and complimentary hand-stitching monogramming and embroidery from Rachel Hearn.

So far, bestsellers include the Fisherman Sweater, a relaxed look offered in cotton and cashmere that retails from $295 to $395, according to a company spokeswoman. Mules in suede or shearling that retail between $395 and $425 have also been of interest.

Meanwhile, swimwear designer Malia Mills has teamed up with the Little Red Planet’s Mindi Smith to open a pop-up and creative space for artists and designers in Sag Harbor that will stay open through the end of September. Instead of paving different routes, there are benefits to working together with people that share your ethos, work ethic and quality, Mills said.

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Shoppers will find swimwear, clothing, accessories and other items for a range of ages. Mills started her swimwear line more than 25 years ago in New York City. The Little Red Planet specializes in sustainable children’s wear from 30 international designers.

Mills and Smith decided to team up after each closed their respective stores in the Hamptons last year. The Little Red Planet outpost is located at 34 Long Island Avenue. “It’s awesome the ultimate summer share. We’re sharing our house. We’re sharing her store,” said Mills.

Having had a Hamptons location for 12 years, the company has a loyal following there, Mills said. Shoppers are now more inclined to shop online and in-person, and they are price-conscious, the designer said. “Our customer is very supportive of us. They have been shopping with us throughout the pandemic. Obviously, that’s something that we’re grateful for,” she said.

A popular item is the $125 zero-waste Course of Trade “Chi It Forward” bag that is sewn by women who have been victims of sexual violence, been incarcerated or are struggling to be financially independent. Mills’ production director Libby Mattern created this industrial learn-to-sew program, which also includes resume writing and other essential trainings, a few years ago.

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